Wazwan Delicacies

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The wazwan is prepared on firewood.
The wazwan is prepared on firewood.
Distributing the food in Plates.
Distributing the food in Plates.

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Tabakh Maaz (Fried Rack of Lamb also known as Qabargah. Hindu and Muslim differences make way for specific names for food authentic to the prevalent religion in the area.)
Tabakh Maaz (Fried Rack of Lamb also known as Qabargah. Hindu and Muslim differences make way for specific names for food authentic to the prevalent religion in the area.)
The cook or the "WAZA" distributes the different dishes during the wazwan.
The cook or the “WAZA” distributes the different dishes during the wazwan.
Salad
Salad
Kababs
Kababs
 (Pounded lamb meatballs in spicy red gravy)Bowls filled with "RISTA ",
(Pounded lamb meatballs in spicy red gravy)Bowls filled with “RISTA “,

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Wazwan is prepared on firewood.
Wazwan is prepared on firewood.
Taking the Wazwan, People eat in a group of four in a common plate called as "TRAMI"
Taking the Wazwan, People eat in a group of four in a common plate called as “TRAMI”

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Tabakh Maaz (Fried Rack of Lamb also known as Qabargah. Hindu and Muslim differences make way for specific names for food authentic to the prevalent religion in the area.)
Tabakh Maaz (Fried Rack of Lamb also known as Qabargah. Hindu and Muslim differences make way for specific names for food authentic to the prevalent religion in the area.)
Preparing the Rista and Gushtaba (Pounded lamb meatballs in spicy red gravy)
Preparing the Rista and Gushtaba (Pounded lamb meatballs in spicy red gravy)

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The head chef distributing the mutton for different dishes
The head chef distributing the mutton for different dishes
The set up for ooking wazwan
The set up for cooking wazwan

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Making the cheese
Making the cheese
The Head cook, takes a look at the Recipies
The Head cook, takes a look at the Recipies
People wash hands in an arrangement called as "TASH NAER "
People wash hands in an arrangement called as “TASH NAER “

Wazwan, a multi-course meal in the Kashmiri Muslim tradition, is treated with great respect. Its preparation is considered an art. Almost all the dishes are meat-based (lamb, chicken, fish).Beef is generally not prepared in the Srinagar region, but is popular among the other districts. It is considered a sacrilege to serve any dishes based around pulses or lentils during this feast. The traditional number of courses for the wazwan is thirty-six, though there can be fewer. The preparation is traditionally done by a vasta waza, or head chef, with the assistance of a court of wazas, or chefs.

Wazwan is regarded by the Kashmiri Muslims as a core element of their culture and identity. Guests are grouped into fours for the serving of the wazwan. The meal begins with a ritual washing of hands, as a jug and basin called the tash-t-nari are passed among the guests. A large serving dish piled high with heaps of rice, decorated and quartered by four seekh kabab, four pieces of meth maaz, two tabak maaz, sides of barbecued ribs, and one safed kokur, one zafrani kokur, along with other dishes. The meal is accompanied by yoghurt garnished with Kashmiri saffron, salads, Kashmiri pickles and dips. Kashmiri Wazwan is generally prepared in marriages and other special functions. The culinary art is learnt through heredity and is rarely passed to outside blood relations. That has made certain waza/cook families very prominent. The wazas remain in great demand during the marriage season (May – October).

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